Thursday, November 6, 2008

I Found A Honey Bee Hive

The last couple days we have been having some warm days. It is actually kind of funny how two months ago it would be a bad day if the temp was 18c(65F) and now its like a beach day. I have been taking advantage of the nice days either biking or going waterfalling.

On my last ride I went on I came across a honey bee hive in a tree along the bike trail. At first I thought it was a coat hanging in the tree but as I came closure it certainly was a honey bee hive. It seemed kind of strange to me that they built a hive on a branch right in the open. I was always under the impression that they built hives inside trees, in the ground or in structures. I guess you learn something new every day. Either way it was exciting to see a honey bee hive after there being such a problem the last few season with colony collapse disorder.

15 comments:

  1. I've never seen one out in the open like that....sure, i've seen lots of bee swarms up in trees, but never where they actually stayed and did their thing right there....interesting.....

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  2. I don't think I've seen a hive that large and out in the open, either. In many cases, it's "out of sight, out of mind," regarding bee hives, but your post had me looking for information about colony collapse disorder. I suppose it's no surprise that pesticides, predators and some other out-of-balance factors are affecting the adult worker bee population. The drop in bees and pollination resulting from CCD might lead to a food production crisis later on.

    On a positive note, great, clear photos of the beehive and frost in your recent entries.

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  3. eg - it is kind of interesting, I guess it would have been well hidden when the leaves were on the tree but still I think it is very unusual.

    sally - there is many issues facing honey bee populations. A few of the explanations for ccd that I have heard are:

    -large scale operations that move bees around to pollinate large singular food crops are the problem. It is said that it is not healthy for bee's to feed on a monoculture

    - mites can be a problem if the pesticide to control them is over used and they become resistant to it. Mites can also carry disease throughout colonies

    - there has also been opinions that a virus of some kind has mutated and is killing them off

    - I have also heard the increased use of cell phone towers is messing with them.

    This is a world wide problem with parts of Asia already losing all there honey bees. Lets hope this problem goes its course or a cure is found because like you side it could create a food crisis.

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  4. Wow! What a find! Tons of bees too. That was a pretty exciting bike ride.

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  5. How exciting! I have never seen one either! Maybe you should contact a local agriculture dept to report this so they can protect them or something....

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  6. It looks to me like someone or something has cracked that bee colony open. Those honey combs should not be open to the elements like that. It should be a closed capsule. Do you perhaps have bears or racoons out there?

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  7. tina - it was nice to see

    skeeter - I e-mailed a bee keeper to ask if this is a normal occurrence. I think most of the bees had died off already with the cold we have had, I saw maybe 2 bee's flying around. I don't think such a hive would make it through the winter being so exposed.

    matron - The hive was busted up, there was hunks all over the ground. We do have raccoons & possums which may have done the damage. It is also right beside a very busy trail, someone may have caused the damage.

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  8. You are the adventure kid Dan, and you seem to find some of the most interesting things when you go out good eye man! awesome, make sure everyone knows to check your flicker page too! :)

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  9. Sad to think of them dying....

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  10. I am petrified of bees, I would have freaked!!

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  11. WOW, I too had the impression that wild honey bee hives were built in hollow tree trunks. If I were you I would keep a close eye on it, To me it seems like a great privilege to have one so near to you. Especially with the bees all dying out!

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  12. How very interesting. I've never seen a beehive quite like that before.

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  13. skeeter - it is kind of a sad that they will most likely die off. The hive should have created a couple new queens though that will fly off and create there own hive next season.

    leighann - I'm not the biggest fan of things that will sting me either. Good thing honey bees are not very aggressive compared to hornets.

    organic gardener - I will have to keep checking it, who knows, maybe it will survive the winter and I can photograph it even larger next year.

    dp - it was a first for me too.

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  14. I am really surprised at your find, but isn't it a thing of beauty?

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  15. Red Icculus - It was quite a sight, that's for sure.

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